Supporters and protesters to go head-to-head on Saint FM

May 14th, 2010

Windfarm supporters and protesters are being given the opportunity to go head-to-head in an hour-long radio debate.

Developer RidgeWind has submitted an application to build a nine-turbine farm – now commonly known as the Middlewick windfarm – three kilometres east of Southminster.

Representatives from Ridgewind and Siege (Southminster Inhabitants Environmental Group Enterprise) will both be on the panel in front of a live studio audience.

Saint FM, the Maldon district’s community radio station, will host the debate on June 14 from 7.30pm at St Peter’s High School, Southminster Road, Burnham.

The debate will be recorded and played on the radio – 94.7fm – on various times in the following week.

To be a part of the studio audience, call 01621 787829 or e-mail sandra.martin@saintfm.org.uk

Pro wind farm group set up in Burnham

May 12th, 2010

By Adam Cornell

A PRO wind farm group has been set up in Burnham.

Residents Patti Kyrnza and Lauren Hartley have set up Middlewick WoW (Wonder of Wind) to challenge Siege – Southminster Inhabitants Environmental Group Enterprise.

The pair have accused Siege – which campaigns against wind farms in the Dengie Peninsula – of scaremongering and have now set up the new lobbying group as a direct response.

For the full story see this week’s Standard.

Radio Station to host Wind Farm Debate

May 12th, 2010

Saint FM, Maldon District’s Community Radio Station, is hosting a debate about the proposed Middlewick Wind Farm.

The event is taking place on Monday 14th June at 7.30pm in the Drama Studio at St Peter’s High School, Southminster Road, Burnham-on-Crouch, CM0 8QB.

Developer RidgeWind is hoping to construct a 9-turbine wind farm on the Dengie Peninsula, 3km east of Southminster. Opposition to this project has come from a campaign group called SIEGE (Southminster Inhabitants Environmental Group Enterprise).

Representatives of both RidgeWind and SIEGE – along with other interested parties, both for and against the project – will be on the panel for this hour long debate.

It will take place in front of a live studio audience, who will also have the chance to pose their questions.

Saint FM Station Manager Sandra Amey-Martin says “Saint FM prides itself on being a radio station by the community and for the community – therefore it is vitally important that we cover the issues that are affecting the lives of local people with events such as this. This is a chance for the public – and the Maldon Councillors making the decision on planning permission for the Middlewick Wind Farm – to hear all about it directly from the people actually involved.”

If you want to be in the studio audience for the Middlewick Debate, please contact Sandra Amey- Martin 01621 787829 or sandra.martin@saintfm.org.uk

The Middlewick debate is also being recorded and will be played out on St FM 94.7 at various times during the week, for details and times please check the Saint FM website. You can also listen online at www.saintfm.org.uk

Middlewick Wind Farm Support Group Launches

May 10th, 2010

Scaremongering over a proposed wind farm has got the wind up a group of Dengie residents.

In fact, they’ve become so fed-up with the claims of rival organisation, SIEGE they have established their own lobbying group, Middlewick WoW.

The acronym stands for ‘Wonder of Wind’ and is the brainchild of Lauren Hartley and Patti Kyrnza, both from Burnham on Crouch.

The pair decided to start their campaign as a direct response to Southminster Inhabitants Environmental Group Enterprise, the group campaigning to prevent the Middlewick Wind Farm from going ahead.

Patsy says “There has been a lot of rubbish said and written about this project – including visibility of the turbines, transport, house prices, noise and wildlife – but these are all lies designed by the anti-protestors to frighten people into siding with them. We got so frustrated by their outrageous claims that we decided to start a group in support of the wind farm and do all we can to make sure the true facts are heard.”

She added, “We want to show the Maldon Councillors making the final decision that the majority of local people ARE in favour of Middlewick, and they should not be taken in by the claims of a vocal minority.”

Lauren believes that clean, locally-generated ‘green’ energy can only be a good thing, saying “Wind power is fantastic and desperately needed. Middlewick will supply electricity to 38% of all the homes in the Maldon district. People need to wake up and realise that unless we start utilising these alternative sources of power, we are not going to be able to turn on our lights in 15 years time. WoW will be doing all it can to make sure this project goes ahead, by carrying out lobbying and distributing leaflets and posters. ”

To get involved with Middlewick WoW, please call Patti Kyrnza on 01621 784394 or email pakyrnza@idnet.com

Plans to construct a nine turbine wind farm, 3km east of Southminster have been submitted to Maldon District Council, with a decision due early summer 2010. For more information on Middlewick Wind Farm, visit www.ridgewind.com

Estate Agent says House Prices will not drop due to windfarm

March 30th, 2010

An Essex Estate Agent and Auctioneer has voiced his support for the proposed windfarm at Middlewick, saying it will not lead to drop in house prices.
Developer RidgeWind is hoping to construct a nine turbine wind farm on the Dengie Peninsula. SIEGE, the group campaigning against the Middlewick Wind Farm, claim if the development is allowed to go ahead then it will lead to a drop in property prices.

But Mike Gray from Dedman Gray Property Consultants – who has over thirty years experience in the Essex property business – says that is just not true.

Mike says “There is actually very little evidence that long term house prices are affected by wind farms. In fact any value drop is associated with the planning/construction phase, and that is commonly attributed to the protests of anti-groups – so actually it is the actions of the protest groups themselves that could lead to any price drop, and not the windfarm itself!”

He adds that a 2007 windfarm study by the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) shows that prices recover swiftly if there is a drop, “The study says evidence of any perceived house price fall diminishes rapidly the further from the windfarm, with the survey confirming that from more than one mile there is no significant impact. Their conclusion states ‘there is evidence to suggest that the ‘threat’ of a wind farm may have a more significant impact that the actual presence of one.’ So with the Middlewick windfarm being around 3km from Southminster, in my opinion I really cannot see it having any significant impact on property prices.”

See the RICS report at http://www.rics.org/site/download_feed.aspx?fileID=3524&fileExtension=PDF

NOTES TO EDITORS
ABOUT MIDDLEWICK

  • RidgeWind has submitted a planning application for a nine turbine wind farm for 25 years only.
  • The site is approximately 3km east of Southminster and 5km north east of Burnham-on-Crouch.
  • This application follows several years of robust ecological surveys, site assessments and a public exhibition.
  • Middlewick will create enough electricity to power 9620 homes – that’s 38% of all the homes in the Maldon district
  • RidgeWind works to maximise the community benefit of its wind farms by contributing funds from their wind farms to Community Benefit Schemes managed by a local committee. The value of the Middlewick fund is likely to be between £36,000— £54,000 per year for the lifetime of the wind farm.
  • The planning application was submitted to Maldon District Council in January 2010, a decision is expected by early summer 2010.
  • More information at www.ridgewind.com

ABOUT DEDMAN GRAY

  • Mike Gray has been responsible for moving over 10,000 people in his career. He has acted for many businesses throughout Essex, and is a specialist on selling and letting both residential and commercial property, also property auctions.
  • Dedman Gray Commercial was voted the Most Active Commercial Agent in Essex for 2009 by the Estates Gazette.
  • Find out more at www.dedmangray.co.uk

Note that we have been provided the text of this press release for use on our website by RidgeWind, but that We Want a Wind Farm is in no way connected to RidgeWind or Dedman Gray. We support the development of the Middlewick Wind Farm because we need to decarbonise the production of energy.

RidgeWind counters false claims of wind farm overshadowing Southminster

March 15th, 2010
Southminster High Street showing position of Middlewick turbines

None of the nine turbines at the Middlewick wind farm will be visible from Southminster High Street because the buildings, walls, trees, etc get in the way. Note how small they are from this distance. A blight? Certainly not!

RidgeWind, the developer hoping to construct a nine turbine wind farm on the Dengie Peninsula, has produced a new computer generated image to dispel claims that the project will be visible from Southminster High Street.

SIEGE, the group campaigning against the Middlewick Wind Farm, believes that the turbines will be clearly visible from the village and have produced their own graphic to support this.

The image has been published in the local press and on their website and clearly shows three wind turbines dominating the skyline at the end of the High Street. It is captioned with: ‘Accurate scale illustration of the view of the Turbines from Southminster High St.’

In response, RidgeWind have employed one of the UK’s leading producers of wind farm visualisations to prove the SIEGE illustration is wholly inaccurate. Middlewick Project Manager Nigel Goodhew says: “A photograph was taken from the same perspective on the High Street as the SIEGE one, and using advanced computer technology the actual location and scale of each of the proposed Middlewick turbines in the landscape has been overlaid in red. The nearest turbine is approximately 3.0km away from the viewpoint location. This confirms that the wind farm will not be visible – in any way, shape or form – from this point of Southminster High Street, due to the build of the town and the distance to the wind farm.”

He added: “The Environmental Statement which accompanied the planning application for the Middlewick Wind Farm submitted to Maldon District Council included many visualisations, but not a viewpoint from Southminster High Street – because there is NO view of the site from this location. Sadly, SIEGE’s imagery is an example of misinformation which is portrayed to the local resident, which understandably will give unnecessary concern. We hope that our accurate illustrations will help at least dispel some of these myths. Middlewick is a fantastic opportunity to provide clean, British, green, energy whilst creating local jobs and investment in the Dengie peninsula.”

NOTES TO EDITORS

  • RidgeWind has submitted a planning application for a nine turbine wind farm for 25 years only.
  • The site is approximately 3km east of Southminster and 5km north east of Burnham-on-Crouch.
  • This application follows several years of robust ecological surveys, site assessments and a public exhibition.
  • Middlewick will create enough electricity to power 9620 homes – that’s 38% of all the homes in the Maldon district area
  • RidgeWind works to maximise the community benefit of its wind farms by contributing funds from their wind farms to Community Benefit Schemes managed by a local committee. The value of the Middlewick fund is likely to be between £36,000— £54,000 per year for the lifetime of the wind farm.
  • The planning application was submitted to Maldon District Council in January 2010 and a decision is expected by early summer 2010.
  • More information at www.ridgewind.com

Note that we have been provided the text of this press release for use on our website by RidgeWind, but that We Want a Wind Farm is in no way connected to RidgeWind. We support the development of the Middlewick Wind Farm because we need to decarbonise the production of energy.

Let’s run school on the wind!

April 10th, 2007

A SCHOOL could power itself if plans for a wind turbine prove successful.

Blenheim Primary School, in Leigh, is applying for permission to put up a 15m mast with wind turbine on the school grounds.

It is further proof of the school’s commitment to the environment since it joined the Eco-Schools programme, which promotes teaching children about the environment.

The programme also encourages schools to adopt a turbine for their energy needs.

Allison Ellis, spokeswoman for Eco-Schools, said: “The school could become self-sustainable when it comes to electricity.

“One wind turbine can provide enough electricity required for one school.

“If it produces more than they need, they could even sell it back to the national grid. It depends on their location and how much wind there is.

“There are already a number of schools where a wind turbine produces all the energy they need.”

Ms Ellis said a turbine was great for education.

She said: “Children have to learn there is a limit to the valuable resources on our earth and the importance of looking at renewable energy sources.

“A wind turbine is a fantastic way to do it.”

Small wind turbines are becoming more popular as a way to produce electricity.

Marks and Spencer, in High Street, Southend, plan to install three wind turbinea on their roof as part of its ongoing refurbishment.

In 2004, Rayleigh man David Nisbet broke the mould when he became the first person in south Essex to install a 9m wind turbine in his yard to power his home.

Wind turbines: the worst case

May 17th, 2006

A WIND farm planned for Bradwell could be seen from virtually every village in the Dengie Peninsula – and for miles beyond.

The turbines may even be visible from further away than Colchester, Braintree, Chelmsford and Southend.

A diagram included with documents provided to Maldon District Council by applicants Npower Renewables sows the tip of the huge structures would be seen from more than 20 miles in any direction.

But it does not take into account vegetation and other structures which may impair the view.

Npower Renewables spokesman, Michael Pullan, said because of the way it was created, the diagram was “an unrealistic, worst case image”.

The planning application asks for permission to install ten three-bladed turbines at Hockley Farm, Hockley Lane.

If given the go-ahead, a sub-station, anemometer mast, electrical equipment compound and a temporary construction compound would also be constructed.

The turbines, which have a “design life” of 20 to 25 years, would produce enough electricity for up to 10,600 homes.

Mark Jackson, development control officer at the council, said the turbines would be the biggest that can be safely designed, installed and maintained.

He said the wind farm application is one of the larges officers have dealt with in years.

Former chief planning officer Clive Tokley has been recruited to sift through the mountains of paperwork required.

Officers from other council departments are also involved.

Mr Jackson said: “I cannot remember an application this big. Very few are submitted with an environmental impact assessment.”

It is expected that Mr Tokley may spend up to 70 hours working on the case, while a similar figure could be clocked up by district council officers.

Mr Jackson said the total cost of dealing with the case would not be known until councillors have made their final decision but it would be a “considerable expense to the council”.

The application is likely to be considered by the council’s south east area planning committee on June 12, and then by a special planning and licensing committee in July.

The 16-week deadline for making a decision on the case is in August.

Burnham-on-Crouch leafletted

April 15th, 2006

Local environmentalists leaflet the vast majority of Burnham-on-Crouch. You can see the leaflet for yourself.

Deadline for Bradwell Wind Farm correspondence approaching

April 8th, 2006

All correspondence with regards to the Bradwell Wind Farm should be received by 25th April.

This was taken from the notices that have gone up at the site:

A copy of the application(s) and plans may be inspected at the Council Offices during normal office hours. Any representations on the application(s) should be made in writing to the address shown below or by email to dc.planning@maldon.gov.uk stating your full name and postal address by 25 April 2006. Letters received are not acknowledged at the time of receipt although you will be notified of the Council’s decision. All representations received will be made available for public inspection and will be taken into account by the Council when it considers the application.